Merits

Voivodate Status (1 to 5)
Status in the Voivodate acts as social bonus dice against Tzimisce in some situations. Additionally, anyone with dots in Voivodate Status can buy the Domain and Retainer merits for half price. This bonus only applies after character creation and can only be used in a situation where the Voivodate is distinct as a covenant. Kindred with dots in Voivodate status have access to the Koldunic Sorcery, the magic created or stolen by the Tzimisce in time past. The myth or their origin is told thusly:
“When the Eldest came to Eastern Europe, the land spit him out. The beasts hunted him and the forest rose up against him. The Eldest was a powerful Fiend, but not equipped to fight the land itself. In his despair he cried out a name he knew from his mortal life: Kupala.
This was the name of a demon, or a god, or the powerful spirit. The nature of Kupala is lost now, because the Eldest was the last one who knew the secrets of his people, a tribe he slaughtered after his embrace. How this tribe knew of Kupala and where they lived is as mysterious as the name of the Eldest and the nature of Kupala himself.
Kupala answered the call and he stepped over the mountains that separated this world from the world of the gods, or the demons, or the spirits. Where he entered this realm, he left a crater. This crater is still a holy site to the Koldún. He spoke to the Eldest in a long lost language and taught him the magic of the gods, or the demons, or the spirits. And with this magic the Eldest conquered the land, and we inherited him from him. So it become our land, till the day Kupala arises and and the stars go out.”
Code of Honor: 3-point merit
A code of honor is a personal code that allows a vampire to retain his humanity in the medieval world of darkness. Characters with this merit do not roll humanity when killing or wounding others in war, duels or lawful punishment. The following conditions apply: duels have to be agreed to by both parties and must follow the agreed upon rules, no humanity loss for war killings only applies to soldiers of the enemy on the battlefield and lawful punishment is a sin committed against someone who has been proven to be guilty of a crime in a court of law. The punishment has to be proportional to the crime, however.
A honorable person cannot abide evil. Any acts committed in the company of a character with Code of Honor with a threshold sin lower than their humanity cause a humanity roll in the character with Code of Honor, unless the character tries to stop them from happening. This only goes for sins he’s aware of. The measures the character has to take to stop the sin from happening are equal to the threshold sin committed (i.e. if someone steals in the company of Michael, a humanity 8 Deava with the Code of Honor merit, he may try to talk the thieves down or apply a beating, but if that doesn’t work he does not have to kill someone to stop them from stealing. If someone tries to torture another in Michael’s presence though, he must try stopping them with any means necessary, even if doing so would be suicidal, or roll for humanity). Character with this merit may not have the Zeal or Detachment merits.
Zeal: 5-point merit
Prerequisite: Resolve 4 or higher
Characters with Zeal are True Believers. Whatever cause they believe in, they believe in it with heart and soul. Any time a character with this merit commits a sin in the defense or advancement of the cause he believes in, he may roll Wits + Resolve. If the roll turns up any successes, the sin is ignored and the character does not have to roll for humanity loss. As a drawback, more sins are added to the humanity table. Pretending not to believe in the cause is a humanity 8 sin. Not showing regular devotion to the cause is humanity 6 treshold sin. Unanswered insults to the cause are a humanity 4 sin and so is turning down the opportunity to convert another. The second gravest sin to zealots is not stopping major threats to their faith. Showing doubt is the greatest sin of all and equal to acts of utter perversion to the True Believer. These new sins cannot be ignored with a Zeal roll. Zealots may not have the Code of Honor or Detachment merits.
Detachment: 4-point merit
Prerequisite: Composure 3 or higher
Characters possessing this merit are cut off from normal emotions. Sins just don’t have the same impact to these characters. Sins committed in the pursuit of knowledge are ignored if the character manages to rationalize his behavior to himself with a Intelligence + Manipulation roll. This merit has a drawback though, destruction of knowledge becomes a Humanity 3 sin and sharing it becomes a humanity 5 sin. Characters with this merit thus hoard knowledge, even if they are better served by destroying or sharing it. This only goes for scholastic knowledge (up to DM discretion). Finally, showing emotion is anathema to Detached characters and thusly a humanity 1 sin. Detached characters may not have the Code of Honor or Zeal merits.
Merit: Armory (1 to 5)
Prerequisites: Resources 3
Your character can draw upon an array of weapons and armor. This Merit could represent a large gun collection, the ability to call in favors for arms or ownership of a firearms or martial arts supply store. When you select this Merit, give it a descriptor such as “dojo weapons” or “hunting club.” This will guide your use of the Merit. Each dot provides five “points” of weapons and armor. The pool of dots provides a vaguely defined assortment of available arms. You may use weapons and armor equal to your pool total at any given time. The base pool cost for a weapon is equal to its Damage rating. Add 1 to the cost if the weapon is a firearm. Armor has a pool cost equal to its Defense bonus. Add 1 to the cost of any weapon or piece of armor if it’s illegal or highly restricted. The maximum Damage or Defense rating possible for any Armory equipment is equal to the Merit’s dots + 1. Firearms come with a full load or magazine. One Armory point adds an additional load or magazine. You don’t need to account for every single knife and gun, and in fact, there are more parts and arms than the pool would allow — the equivalent of the classic briefcase or rack full of guns. Your total represents arms in good enough repair to actually use. You may change weapon selections freely as long as the choices could plausibly fit under the general descriptor.
Drawback: Unlike arms and armor purchased with standard Resources, Armory gear is gray market at best. It includes a selection of stolen, illegally modified or improperly registered weapons. If the authorities discover your Armory, you might incur a fine or imprisonment.
Staff (1 to 5)
Prerequisite: Resources (varies)
Your character has official command over a staff of employees. These people are mundane mortals, but they’re also professionally trained and capable of taking
on a host of roles. An aristocratic household, for example, might employ a number of maids, valets and cooks, while a social predator might have publicists, investigators and lawyers on the payroll.
The number of dots in this Merit reflects the relative size and complexity of the force at your character’s disposal. You can assign a category to each dot, reflecting
the separate tasks that can be delegated at any given time. For example, if you have Staff 3, you could assign the dots to chauffeurs, gardeners and security guards. Your character could then assign tasks involving driving guests, landscaping and guard detail to her own employees without requiring special effort beyond a simple dispensation of orders. The number of dots your character can have in this Merit is limited by the number of people your household can afford to employ. You may not have more dots in Staff than you have in Resources.
Tomb (1 to 4)
Prerequisite: Haven 1
Effect: Tomb is to Haven as a vault is to a padlock. While both provide some measure of security, a Tomb is nearly impregnable. Tombs in ancient Egypt and Babylon were built beneath havens as a matter of survival. Throughout history, the Damned have needed a place where they could sleep without fear of discovery. Gravediggers, miners and archeologists bent on raiding sacred resting places could not be allowed access to a Kindred’s greatest secrets, so added security was necessary.
1) 1 room, earthen, with a crawlspace leading to primary haven
2) 2 rooms, some furnishings and a tunnel leading to primary haven
3) 3 rooms, furnished, security measures in place with multiple tunnels leading to the primary haven
4) 4+ rooms, comfortably furnished, extensive security measures with multiple tunnel system leading to various locations, including primary haven.
In order for an intruder to access a Tomb, he must first gain entrance to the vampire’s Haven (and cope with any Haven Security measures that the vampire has in place). From there, any rolls to find or gain ingress to the Tomb suffer a negative modifier equal to the vampire’s rating in Haven Security + the vampire’s rating in the Tomb Merit. For example, a vampire with Haven (Size 1, Security 2) and Tomb 2 has taken over the basement of an apartment building. The basement is small, but serviceable, and the undead inhabitant has taken measures to hide his presence and keep intruders out. He has also dug a tunnel into the nearby sewer system and found a disused room with thick concrete walls — his Tomb. Anyone who breaches his Haven suffers a -4 modifier to find and gain entrance to the Tomb. In addition, a vampire can seal the Tomb from the inside. This doubles the Tomb rating for purposes of figuring this modifier. In the example above, if the vampire decides to go into torpor in this Tomb, anyone trying to get in suffers a -6 to all attempts (Haven Security 2 + [Tomb 2 × 2]).
Paramour (3 to 5)
You have had a long-term (minimum of 75 years) relationship with a fellow Kindred. Although you may have had your disagreements over the many years, you are generally loyal to each other. You know most, if not all, of your paramour’s secrets, and your paramour knows as much about you. You have both come to each other’s aid several times over the years, and you would be aggrieved were anything to happen to your love. The cost of this Merit depends on the relative power and position of your paramour in Kindred society (3 for an ancilla, 4 for another elder of equal power, 5 for a more powerful elder).
Childe (1 to 5)
You have a created a childe. The amount of dots invested in this merit determines the power and loyalty of this childe. A 5-dot childe can be either an uncompromisingly loyal but not very powerful childe or a vastly powerful but distance childe. There are no hard rules for this merit. Send the childes to me and I will judge if they are appropriate for their cost.

Merits

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